NGA Home   Online Tickets   Home   Themes   Education   Compare Works   Search
Education Kit Works  
 
  Claude Monet, 1899, Nadar, © Editions Du Patrimoine
Information for teachers

Introduction
How to use this web site with students
Secondary online worksheet
Primary online worksheet
How to make a visit to the exhibition

Introduction

Monet and Japan is an exhibition based on Monet’s paintings and related Japanese woodblock prints. Monet never travelled to Japan but he owned over 200 Japanese prints, many of which were hung in his house in Giverny.

This exhibition shows how Japanese prints and paintings helped to shape Monet’s art during six decades, influencing not only his style and subject matter, but the very way he saw the world.

The exhibition is hung thematically and these themes are reflected in the layout of the website. Each theme when selected will present you with a written introduction and a screen of thumbnail sized images belonging to that theme. You can enlarge these images and read the text relating to these works of art.

The Themes
Monet’s earliest landscapes and views of urban life from the 1860s are displayed in the section called Modern Life: Modern Vision. Japanese prints which reflect a similar interest in subject matter and composition are hung nearby.

The second theme Forces of Nature reveals Monet’s interest in the dynamic relationship between surging water and immovable rocks. He painted these dramatic works while visiting the Norman and Breton coasts in north-western France during the 1880s. Japanese woodblock prints in this section frequently represent the movement of waves against a tranquil sky to evoke the dynamism of nature.

The Series theme displays Monet’s series paintings of haystacks and poplars with Japanese serial views; most notably Hokusai’s celebratedThirty-six Views of Mount Fujiand hisHundred Views of Mount Fuji.

The fourth theme Giverny contains many paintings created by Monet at his home in Giverny, about 40 kilometres north-west of Paris. Here Monet created a Japanese inspired water garden, the subject of all his later work. Superb painted Japanese screens are displayed nearby. The screens’ large central areas of unmodulated space echo the ambiguous reflections and floating waterlilies of Monet’s late paintings.

How to use this web site with students

  1. Themes button on the main menu
    • Look at the Monet paintings and the Japanese prints displayed within each theme.
    • Read the information beside many of the works of art.
    • Compare the Monet paintings with the Japanese prints within each theme. Use the tool bar beneath the Monet paintings. Click on compare and then click on subject matter, composition or design to select works of art that are grouped together because of similarities within these categories.

  2. Compare Works button on main menu
    This section enables you to sort the Monet paintings and the Japanese prints into categories, thereby revealing their similarities. Works of art from the entire exhibition rather than within each theme can be sorted according to subject matter, composition or design.

  3. Advanced Search
    By entering information into the boxes you can select how you want the images and text displayed. You can also sort the images by the theme, the artist’s last name, the title of the work, the media and the category.

Secondary online worksheet (to download and photocopy for student use)

  1. Click on the Themes button on the main menu
    1. Within each theme select a painting by Monet.
    2. By using the compare button below this painting find the Japanese prints that correspond to that painting.
    3. Check out each of the categories: subject matter, composition and design.
    4. Click on the Monet collection button to view the woodblock prints that Monet actually owned.

  2. Click on Compare Works button on main menu
    • Select Subject
        Select Figures in landscape
        1. Find a Japanese print titled Turban-shell Hall of the Five Hundred Rakan Temple by Hokusai
          Click to enlarge and then read the information
      Select Composition
      Select High View Point
        1. List the similarities and differences between The pink skiff by Monet and Full blossom at Arashiyama by Hiroshige
      Select Design
        Select Colour Mood
        1. List the similarities between Monet’s View of Argenteuil, snow and Evening snow at Kanbaraby Hiroshige

  3. Click on Search
      Type in Ochanomizu in the Main Title box
      1. Read the accompanying information
      2. What does the term ‘Edo’ refer to?
      Type inGarden of the Princessin the Main title box and read the information
      1. Which Japanese artist may have inspired this work?
      Explore the following works of art through the Main title box:
      1. Rock Points at Port-Goulphar
        List some of the ‘Japanese’ stylistic references
      2. Haystacks at midday
        Which print by Hokusai may have inspired this painting?
Spend some time exploring these three sections:
    • Themes
    • Compare Works
    • Search

Primary online worksheet (to download and photocopy for student use)
  1. Click on Themes in the main menu
      Click on Modern Life: Modern Vision
      Click on View Works in this theme
        1. Find two paintings by Monet of snow scenes
        2. Find a painting by Monet of a railway bridge
        3. Click on the painting to see the text. Click on the purple words in the text to see Japanese prints similar to this painting

  2. Click on Themes in the main menu
      Click on the theme Forces of Nature
      Click on View Works in this theme
        1. Find a painting by Monet of a rock arch called TheManneporte (Etretat)
        2. How does the artist make this arch appear so large? Look for the figures

  3. Click on Themes in the main menu
      Click on the theme Series
      Click on View Works in this theme
        1. Click on Hokusai’sSouth wind clear skies
        2. Read the text to find out how many views of this mountain were made by Hokusai

  4. Click on Themes in the main menu
      Click on the theme Giverny
      Click on View Works in this theme
        1. Find a Monet painting with a bridge in it
        2. When was this work of art painted?

  5. Click on Themes in the main menu
      Click on the theme Monet’s collection
        Click on View Works in this theme
        1. Find a Japanese print with a cat in it.
        2. Who made this print?
        3. Find a Japanese print of a fish. What sort of fish is it?
How to make a visit to the exhibition
  • The exhibition Monet and Japan will be on display at the National Gallery of Australia from 9 March until 11 June 2001
  • Opening times: 9.30am until 5.00pm daily
  • Cost: $5.00 per student (booked group only) One teacher per 20 students can enter free of charge.
  • For enquiries and bookings telephone 02 6240 6519
  • Previsit information: A full colour Teacher’s resource will be sent to you after you have made a booking.
  • A free trail is available for primary students on arrival at the Gallery.
Right: Claude Monet, 1899, Nadar, © Editions Du Patrimoine (Detail)