Translucency  
BETTISON
CHIHULY
IKEMOTO
KNOTTENBELT
LALIQUE+RENÉ LALIQ
MINSON
MOJE
PROCTER
ROBINSON

Glass may be intrinsically translucent - that is, characterised by a misty opacity rather than absolute clarity and transparency - because of the method of manufacture. A softened or diffused effect may also be achieved after completion of the form by abrading the surface of the glass mechanically or chemically.

Several prominent glassmakers of the Art Nouveau period used a method known as pâte-de-verre to make translucent glass.A revival of an ancient Roman process, this technique of fusing powdered coloured glass in a mould resulted in works that were distinguished by a subtle, elusive and luminous quality.

Scholars likened a certain type of early Chinese glass to blocks of 'thousand year old ice' on account of its watery translucency. Here, the fugitive luminosity and green tinted translucency of Robert Knottenbelt's i sing of time tide, complements the cellular structure and high-tech connotations of the work.

In contrast, our impression of the translucent orbs of Stephen Procter's Double Gather is of the gentle pulsing of natural light through twin forms composed in a fine equilibrium.

 

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Vista #96, BETTISON, Giles; 2000
Macchia with drawing, CHIHULY, Dale; 1984
Scene 1994, IKEMOTO, Kazumi; 1994
i sing, of time tide, KNOTTENBELT, Robert; 1992, Funded by Visual Arts/Craft Board, Australia Council
'Eucalyptus' vase, LALIQUE, René; RENÉ LALIQUE & CIE, ; design: 1925, manufactured until 1947
Neckpiece, MINSON, James; 1989
Uriarra, MOJE, Klaus; 1985, Purchased from Gallery admission charges 1988
Double Gatherer, PROCTER, Stephen; 1995
Puka Vase, ROBINSON, Ann; 2000, Funded by the Thomas Foundation
Crystal Clarity | Coloured Clarity | Inner Worlds | Translucency | Opaque Counterpoint |
 
Double Gatherer, PROCTER, Stephen; 1995