Inner Worlds  
BRUCE
GORDON
HIRST
KULITJA
MOWBRAY
STADUS
WILLIAMS

The popular nineteenth century idiom of the glass paperweight - its familiar dome shape enclosing an intricate pattern of floral or other motifs - illustrates the potential for the artist to exploit the transparency of glass in making clear-bodied forms that reveal smaller elements or motifs within. These enclosed motifs often appear to be suspended or 'frozen' inside the body of the work, recalling the prehistoric insect preserved within a bead of amber.

Such treatments range from the candid, cell-like enclosures of Ian Mowbray's Not at home - a work that emulates the paperweight tradition - to the regal palette and sumptuous layering of Brian Hirst's Guardian 1, and the fragments of primary colour sliding behind the red sheath of Jane Bruce's Red object #2.

 

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Red Object # 2, BRUCE, Jane; 1995
Mind Play bowl, GORDON, Kevin; 2001
Guardian 1, HIRST, Brian; 1985, Purchase funded by Wagga Wagga Regional Gallery Society
Wira (carrying dish), KULITJA, Rene; 1996
Not at Home, MOWBRAY, Ian; 1989
Winter Pear and Summer Pear, STADUS, Pam; 1993
Simultaneous voyage 3, WILLIAMS, Maureen; 2000
Crystal Clarity | Coloured Clarity | Inner Worlds | Translucency | Opaque Counterpoint |
 
Guardian 1, HIRST, Brian; 1985, Purchase funded by Wagga Wagga Regional Gallery Society