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The James Gleeson oral history collection

James Gleeson interviews Australia's major artists | SUBSCRIBE TO iTUNES PODCAST

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Fiesta 1970
Print, stencil. Technique: screenprint, printed in colour, from five stencils
printed image 52.0 h x 64.8 w cm
sheet 59.9 h x 75.0 w cm
Purchased 1971
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John Coburn

30 May 1979

James Gleeson: When did you first start making prints?
John Coburn: Well, that goes right back to very early days. My wife Barbara has always made silk screen prints for me. She started off, I think, silk screening our Christmas cards many years ago. I think the first silk screen print she did for me must have been in 1958. She has done many editions of screen prints for me since that time. This happens to be one that she didn't do. This one was done in France when a friend of mine visited us in France.
James Gleeson: This was, I think, 1970? We've got on this 1970.
John Coburn: Yes, yes. An Australian artist, who had been very much involved in commercial art and in commercial silk screening, he visited us in France and stayed with us for about a month. While he was there he suggested that we do some screen prints. I was delighted to cooperate. So this particular print, and the other one that the gallery owns, Fiesta, were both printed by Jim Hayes in France, in the garage of the house that we had at that time.
James Gleeson: Well, we'll come to your visits to France presently. But now these are the only two prints, but you say that you have produced a fairly sizeable quantity of prints?
John Coburn: Yes, I would think that I've done about 30 to 40 editions of prints.
James Gleeson: So there's a great need for us to add to this collection if we're going to represent you in that area.
John Coburn: Yes, I think so. Yes, yes. Well, Barbara has done about 25 editions of prints since these were done.

 

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