DETAIL : COLOGNE SCHOOL Germany Virgin and Child with Saints [Triptych of the Virgin and Child with Saints (left panel) Virgin and Child with Saints (left panel)]
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Phillip KING | Dunstable reel
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Phillip KING
Tunisia born 1934
to Great Britain 1946
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Dunstable reel 1970
painted steel
195.7 (h) x 546.4 (w) x 574.4 (d) cm
not signed, not dated
Purchased 1971
NGA 1971.12.A-F
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Biography

Phillip King was born in 1934 in the small village of Kheredine, near Carthage, Tunisia, and arrived in England in 1946. Between 1954 and 1957 he studied modern languages at Christ's College, Cambridge, and it was during this time that he began to make his first sculptures. In 1957 he held his first exhibition at Heffers Gallery, Cambridge, and in the same year he began studying at St Martin's School of Art, London, where he became a teacher in 1959. During 1958-59 he also worked as an assistant to Henry Moore. In 1964 he was given the first of many solo exhibitions at Rowan Gallery, London, and in 1965 he participated in the exhibition 'The New Generation' at Whitechapel Art Gallery, London. In 1966 he contributed to the exhibition 'Primary Structures' at the Jewish Museum, New York, and in 1968 he represented Britain with Bridget Riley at the Venice Biennale. His principal studio at Clay Hall Farm near Dunstable was established in 1969. In 1974 King was given a major exhibition at the Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, which toured to Düsseldorf, Berne, Paris and Belfast. In 197 he was elected an associate of the royal Academy, London, and in 1980 appointed professor of sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London. In 1981 a large exhibition of his work was organised by the Arts Council of Great Britain and shown at the Hayward Gallery, London, and the Fruit Market Gallery, Edinburgh. King lives and works in London.

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