Toulouse-Lautrec
masterclass series

Each Wednesday 6 to 27 March
6.00 – 8.00 pm

A four-week series of Masterclass lectures by key academics and experts in Toulouse-Lautrec. This series is ideal for enthusiasts who want to delve deeply into the rich artistic content of the exhibition. The one-hour lectures are followed by an exhibition viewing from 7.00 – 8.00 pm.

Series $140, $120 concession, $100 members (includes four lectures and exhibition entries)
Single lecture $35, $30 concession, $25 member | bookings essential | James O Fairfax Theatre and Temporary Exhibition Galleries

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec 'Tête-à-tête supper (In a private room – At the 'Rat Mort') (Portrait of Lucy Jourdan)' c.1899, The Courtauld Gallery, London

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec 'Woman pulling on her stocking (Prostitue)' 1894, Museé D'Orsay, Paris

6 March

Jane Kinsman,

Senior Curator, International Prints and Drawings and curator of Toulouse Lautrec: Paris and the Moulin Rouge.

Toulouse-Lautrec and the Houses of Tolerance

Houses of tolerance [maisons de tolérance] were established in Paris during the early nineteenth century when prostitution was tolerated by authorities but not legalised. Luxurious establishments [maisons de luxes] were located in the suburbs of the well-to-do. Alternatively, less wealthy men queued at the ‘slaughterhouse’ [maison d’abattage] for a liaison in miserable surrounds. The dissolute nature of the brothels appealed to Lautrec, as did the matter-of-fact transactions and the unselfconscious attitudes of the prostitutes. Accepted as a regular visitor, Lautrec was afforded access to the private lives of the prostitutes. This lecture will focus new research on Lautrec’s works on this subject.

Dr Jane Kinsman, Senior Curator in the International Art department, is the curator of Toulouse-Lautrec: Paris and the Moulin Rouge. Her previous publications and exhibitions at the National Gallery of Australia include Degas: master of French art (2008-09), James Rosenquist: welcome to the water planet (2006); An artist abroad: the prints of James McNeil Whistler (2005); After image: screenprints of Andy Warhol (2003); The art of collaboration: the big Americans (2002); Intimate Matisse (1999); Dance halls days: French posters from Chéret to Toulouse-Lautrec (1998); Picasso and the Vollard Suite (1997); Paris in the late 19th century (1996); The wild ones (1995); The prints of R.B. Kitaj (1994); Picture puzzles: Marcel Broodthaers (1987); and Daumier and Gavarni (1985). She was also a contributor for the Masterpieces from Paris: Van Gogh, Cézanne, Gauguin and beyond (2009)catalogue. In June 2012 Jane received her doctoral degree for her thesis in Art History.

13 March

Terence Maloon,

Director of the Drill Hall Gallery at the Australian National University and former Senior Curator of Special Exhibitions at the Art Gallery of NSW.

Toulouse-Lautrec and the Society of Spectacle

During his lifetime the famous French novelist Honoré de Balzac witnessed a headlong multiplication of shopping precincts and entertainment venues throughout the centre of Paris, which he termed “a great poem of display”. Closer to our own time, the radical political thinker Guy Debord categorized modernity as a “society of spectacle”. This lecture looks at some of Balzac’s and Debord’s ideas and situates the milieu depicted by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec within the commercial transformation of the “city of light”.

Terence Maloon is Director of the Drill Hall Gallery at the Australian National University and former Senior Curator of Special Exhibitions at the Art Gallery of NSW. He was art critic for the Sydney Morning Herald between 1982 and 1987. Exhibitions he has curated include Paths to Abstraction (2010), Camille Pissarro: A Retrospective Exhibition (2005), Picasso: The last decades (2002), Classic Cézanne (1998), and Drawing the Figure, Michelangelo to Matisse (1999). He also curated monographic exhibitions of Virginia Coventry (2004), Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, Alan Mitelman (1995) and Tony Tuckson (1989) for the Museum of Modern Art at Heide in Melbourne. His book, Sweet Reason: The Art of Charles Pollock (Ball State University, 2003), has just been republished in French translation by Editions Hermann, Paris.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec 'Justine Dieuhl: woman in a garden' 1891, Museé D'Orsay, Paris

20 March

Marcia Pointon,

Professor Emeritus in History of Art at the University of Manchester, and Hon. Research Fellow at the Courtauld Institute of Art.

Toulouse-Lautrec and the Art of Portraiture

Toulouse-Lautrec’s canvases teem with particularized human subjects: it is easy to feel we recognize these people as particular individuals whether they are named or not. This artist’s work thus raises questions about just what portrayal is. Traditionally portraits have been commissioned and are about power. But here we are dealing with subjects the artist has chosen to represent and individuals who are often disempowered. This lecture will focus on a selection of these works and place them in the context of the history of portraiture.

Marcia Pointon is Professor Emeritus in History of Art at the University of Manchester, and Hon. Research Fellow at the Courtauld Institute of Art. Her books include Hanging the Head: Portraiture and Social Formation in Eighteenth-century England (1993), Strategies for Showing: Women, Possession and Representation in English Visual Culture 1665-1800 (1997) and Brilliant Effect: a Cultural History of Gem Stones and Jewellery, published in 2009 by Yale University Press. She has also published many articles, contributions to collections and exhibition catalogues, and research papers on topics ranging from collecting and patronage, landscape, gender studies, to problems in methodology, the body in representation, childhood, and portraiture as most widely understood. She has lectured and given conference papers in many European countries as well as in North America and Australia. She has held research fellowships at the Getty Research Institute, the Clark Art Institute, the National Portrait Gallery, London, the Huntington Library, the Winterthur Museum and Library, and the Yale Center for British Art. Her new book: Portrayal: the Search for Identity will be published in January 2013 by Reaktion Books.

27 March

Anthea Callen,

Professor of Art (Practice-led Research) in the School of Art, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Professor Emeritus of Visual Culture at the University of Nottingham, and Honorary Research Associate at the Institute of Health, University of Warwick.

Making and Meaning: Materials and Techniques in the Work of Lautrec

This Masterclass looks at the experimental range of Lautrec’s drawing and painting techniques, his debts in particular to Edgar Degas, and the ways his gritty uncompromising subject matter of the underbelly of modern urban life in Paris – ‘le demi-monde’ – is represented in his use of modern art materials. Detailed reference will be made to paintings and drawings in the exhibition to enable the audience to reflect on Lautrec’s practice while studying the works of art after the Masterclass.

Anthea Callen is Professor of Art (Practice-led Research) in the School of Art, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra. She is also Professor Emeritus of Visual Culture at the University of Nottingham, and Honorary Research Associate at the Institute of Health, University of Warwick.

Anthea Callen is a scholar and a painter. Her expertise in art history, visual culture and the gender politics of visual representation spans the eighteenth to twentieth centuries, notably in France and Britain; her research specialism in nineteenth-century artists' materials and techniques means she works regularly with museum conservators and curators. As a painter she has a strong personal and professional interest in twentieth century modernism and contemporary art, especially feminist/women's art practice.


Image detail: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec La Goulue entering the Moulin Rouge [La Goulue entrant au Moulin Rouge] 1892
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Gift of Mrs David M. Levy